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Full text of "California Garden, Vol. 76, No.2, March-April 1985"

California, 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 

Seventy-five Cents 

Volume 76 No. 2 

ISSN 0008-1116 




W^ 



HORTICULTURE CALENDAR 



MAR 2, 3 



MAR 7, 14, 21, 28 
San Diego Floral 
Event 

MAR 13, 20, 27 

APR 3 
SDiego Floral Event 
MAR 15, 16, 17 



MAR 16, 17 



MAR 16, 23 
San Diego Floral 
Event 



MAR 22, 23, 24 



MAR 28, 29 



MAR 30, 31 



APR 4, 11, 18, 25 
San Diego Floral 
Event 

APR 7 



APR 13, 14 



APR 13, 14 



SAN DIEGO DAYTIME AFRICAN VIOLET SOCIETY 4TH ANNUAL 
SHOW "March of Violets" 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sat: 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Free 
THURSDAY WORKSHOP WITH COLLEEN WINCHELL 

Free Floral Crafts Instruction - Open to the Public 

San Diego Floral Association Library, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park 

Thurs: 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. - Information: 479-6433 
WESTERN FLOWER ARRANGING WITH MARTHA ROSENBERG 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Wed: 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. - Information: 298-5182 or 296-2757 
SANTA BARBARA INTERNATIONAL ORCHID 40TH ANNIVERSARY 
SHOW "SANTA BARBARA ORCHIDLAND USA" 

Flower Building, Earl Warren Showgrounds, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Fri. & Sat: 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

General Admission: $4; Groups, Sr. Citizens, Students $2; 

Children free (accompanied) 
17TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF IKEBANA & JAPANESE ART - 
SAN DIEGO CHAPTER 119, IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sat. & Sun: 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free 
GARDEN STUDY COURSE IV 

San Diego Floral Association and Palomar District, California Garden 
Clubs, Inc. 

San Diego Floral Association Library, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, 

San Diego Information: 442-4242 (Don Boyer) or 295-1537 (Martha 

Rosenberg) 
SAN DIEGO ORCHID COUNTY SOCIETY 39TH ANNUAL SHOW 
"RAINBOW OF ORCHIDS" 

Al Bahr Shrine Temple, Highway 163 & Clairemont Mesa Blvd., San 

Diego Fri: 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Sat: 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sun: 

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Donation: $1.50 
FLOWER ARRANGERS* GUILD OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
"SPRING-CREATIVE WAY" 

San Marino Woman's Club, 1800 Huntington Dr., San Marino, Calif. 

Thurs:l:00 to 8:00 p.m. Fri:10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Donation $3 
PALOMAR ORCHID SOCIETY EASTER PARADE OF ORCHIDS 

Plaza Camino Real Mall (Lower Level), 2525 El Camino Real, 

Carlsbad, Calif. 

Sat: 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sun: 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. Free 
THURSDAY WORKSHOP WITH COLLEEN WINCHELL 

Free Floral Crafts Instruction - Open to the Public 

San Diego Floral Association Library, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park 

Thurs: 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Information: 479-6433 
CONVAIR GARDEN CLUB'S 36TH ANNUAL ROSE SHOW 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sun: 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Free 
CORONADO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 60TH ANNUAL STANDARD 
FLOWER SHOW <5c GARDEN TOUR "KALEIDOSCOPE" 

Spreckels Park, Orange Ave. (Between 6 & 7), Coronado, Calif. 

Sat: 1:15 to 5:30 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Donation: $1.50 

(Child 25<t) 
RANCHO SANTA FE GARDEN CLUB ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW <5c 
PLANT SALE "LITERATURE IN FLOWER" 

Garden Club, Avenida Acacias & La Granada, Village Center, 

Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. 

Sat: 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Free 

(Continued on Page 63 - inside back cover.) 



34 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Published by 
San Diego Floral Association 

for 76 years. 

PUBLICATION STAFF 

EDITOR 

Allethe Macdonald 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Skipper Cope 
Barbara Jones 
Jo Westheim 
PRODUCTION EDITOR 

Robert 0. Brooks 
CONSULTING EDITORS 

Dr. Geoffrey Levin, Chairman, 
Dept., San Diego Natural 
History Museum 
Dr. Donald P. Watson, Prof. 
Emeritus, Dept. of 
Horticulture, University 
of Hawaii 
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
Carol Greentree 
Bill Gunther 
Allison Voss 
DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Advertising Penny Bunker 
Penny Bunker 
Ethel Hoyt 
Dr. William Nelson 
Elizabeth Glover 



Circulation 
Historical 
Horticulture 
Proof Reading 



-0O0- 



Manuscripts are invited. Deadline 
is 90-days prior to publication 
date. All manuscripts and illustra- 
tions submitted will be handled 
carefully but we cannot assume 
responsibility for their safety. 
All submissions must be accompanied 
by return postage. Hortus Third 
is the authority for all botanical 
names used in this magazine. 
All opinions expressed are those 
of the authors and do not necessari- 
ly reflect the views of the editors 
or the San Diego Floral Association. 
Address all editorial communications 
to: California Garden , Casa del 
Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, 
CA 92101. 



California s,nce i*» 

GARDEN 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NO. ISSN 0008-11 16 



San Diego Floral Association & Garden Center 

Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101 
Monday through Friday, "10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
(619) 232-5762 



VOLUME 76 



MARCH - APRIL 1985 



CONTENTS 



NUMBER 2 



37 
39 
40 
42 
43 
44 
46 
47 
49 
51 

53 
54 
56 
59 



WILDERNESS GARDENS Dorothy Dudley Muth 

A CALENDAR OF AFRICAN BULBS Karen Kees 



BROMELIADS 



Linda Prell 



TRANSPLANTING POTTED HOUSEPLANTS 

Elizabeth B. Glover 
ORCHID ARRANGEMENT 



GROWING PLANTS FROM SEED 



Pat Bleecker 



FLAT-TOPPED BUCKWHEAT Thomas A. Oberbauer 



SOME KENYA TREES 



50 YEARS AGO 



Thomas W. Whitaker 



Carol Greentree 



THE GREATEST REFRESHMENT TO THE SPIRTS 

OF MAN Wes Beal 



THE FLOSS-SILK TREE 



BOOK REVIEWS 



BOOK REVIEWS 



NOW IS THE TIME 



Bill Gunther 



Barbara Jones 



Allethe Macdonald 



Penny Bunker 



COVER: Drawing by Karen Kees, a professional artist and 
garden designer-consultant. The flowers in this 
drawing were from her prize-winning garden. 



®Ca1ifornia Garden (USPS 084-020), a non-profit publication, is 
published bi-monthly by the San Diego Floral Association, Inc., 
a non-profit horticultural organization. Subscriptions are $4.00 
for one year, $7.50 for two years. Entered as second-class matter, 
December 8, 1910, at the Post Office in San Diego, California, 
under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



POSTMASTER; SEND FORM 3579 TO: 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN, CASA DEL PRADO. SAN DIEGO. CA 92101 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



35 



SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION & GARDEN CENTER 

Under the sponsorship of the Park & Recreation Department, City of San Diego 

Meetings: 3rd Tuesday, February, April, June, October 

Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 



OFFICERS 

President 

Barbara S. Jones 222-1032 

3971 Del Mar Ave., San Diego 92107 
1st Vice President 

Mrs. R. G. Lambert 
2nd Vice President 

Mrs. Harry McAllister 
Treasurer 

Mrs. H. 0. Nelson 
Recording Secretary 

Mr. G. Herbert Garrelts 
Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. William J. Walsh 
Past President 

Mrs. Harley Cope 
DIRECTORS 
Term 1982-1985 

Mr. Walter E. Bunker 

Mr. Robert Dodd 

Mrs. James H. Ray 
Term 1983-1986 

Mrs. Mary A. Boykins 

Mrs. John Pasek 

Mrs. William Rathmann 
Term 1984-1987 

Miss Elizabeth Glover 

Mr. Glenn R. Haugh 

Mrs. David Westheim 
HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 

Margaret Baldwin 

Samuel Hamill 

Ethel Hoyt 

Mary Marston 
HONORARY MEMBER 

Mrs. Louis Kulot 
FLOWER ARRANGERS GUILD 

Pres: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

4444 Arista Dr., San Diego 92103 

1st Thurs, Casa del Prado, 9:00 a.m. 



AFFILIATE MEMBERS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BRANCH. 
AMERICAN BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Pres: Mrs. Robert Curtis 273-0657 

1107 Taos Dr. 

San Diego 92117 

2nd Tues.Home of Members . 1 : 30a .m. 
AMERICAN BAMBOO SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Richard A. Haubrich 4B1-9B69 

1101 San Leon Ct.. Solana Beach 92075 
AMERICAN HIBISCUS SOCIETY 
ROSS GAST CHAPTER 

Pres: Mr. Angus Graham 756-0473 

33 Via de la Reina. Bonsall 92003 



BALBOA PARK AFRICAN VIOLET SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Jack Wilson 424-6973 
702 Grissom St.. San Diego 92154 
4th Mon. Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

BERNARDO GARDENERS'" CLUB 

Pres: Eileen Woodburn 487-3914 
1752B Plaza Otonal. San Diego 9212B 
3rd Thurs. Glendale SEL. 1:30 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY 

Pres: Dr. Andrew Wilson 755-0352 
RFD 93G E. Camino Real.DelMar 92014 
3rd Tub, Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Miss Audrey Avery 729-4681 
2756 Highland Dr.. Carlsbad 9200B 
1st Fri, Carlsbad Community Center 
3096 Harding St. Carl sbad. 1 : 30 p.m. 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Wm. Hedenkamp 422-2978 
515 Second Ave. Chula Vista 92010 
3rd Wed.Rohr Pk Manor. Sweetwater Rd, 
Boni ta. 1:00 p.m. 

CONVAIR GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Virginia Soderberg 582-709B 

6197 Arno Dr. San Diego 92120 

1st Wed, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

CROWN GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. David E. Sigsworth 435-502B 

861 Balboa Ave. Coronado 921 IB 

4th Thurs, Coronado Library. 9:00 a.m. 

ESCONDIDO GARDEN CLUB 

Pres. Mrs. Richard Reid 746-7202 
2556 Simmeren Tr. Escondido 92025 
3rd Wed, Joflyn Senior Cen 1:00 p.m. 

EXOTIC PLANT SOCIETY 

Pres: Cindy Drake 271-B933 

11121 Saunders Court. San Diego 92131 

4th Tue, Well's Rec Center 

1235 E. Madison, El Cajon, 7:30 p.m. 

FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mr. Dale McNeice 723-9515 
1474 Via Monserate, Fallbrook 9202B 
Last Thurs ea month except 3rd Thurs 
Oct. No v.Dec, St .Peter' s Church. 10:00 am 

FLEURS DE LEAGUE. LA JOLLA 

Pres: Mrs. Kenneth Hill 756-2757 
P.O. Box 1449, Rancho Santa Fe 92067 
2nd Mon, Home of Members. 10:30 a.m. 

HEARTLAND AFRICAN VIOLET SOCIETY 
Pres: Wanda Melland 440-4357 
1361 Bluebell Way. El Cajon 92021 
2nd Tue, Wells Park. 1153 E.Madison 
Ave. El Cajon. 7:00 p.m. 

ICHIYO SCHOOL OF IKEBANA, SDiegoChap te r 
Pres: Mrs.- Haruko Crawford 465-3046 
10411 SanCarlosDr. Spring Valley 92077 



36 



[Continued on Page 62] 



IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL. CHAPTER 119 

Pres: Mrs. Robert Meredith 270-5795 
5343 Soledad Mountain Rd.SDiego 92109 
4th Wed. Casa del Prado. 10:00 a.m. 

IKENOBO CHAPTER OF SAN DIEGO 

Pres: Mrs. Charles Oehler 27B-56B9 
2B22 Walker Dr. San Diego 92123 

LA JOLLA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Robert Boynton 481-0263 

376 Bellaire St. Del Mar 92014 

3rd Tues. LaJolla Woman's Club, 1:30pm 

LAS JARDINERAS 

Pres: Mrs. Stoddard Martin 454-4BB3 
7538 Caminito Avola, LaJolla 92037 
3rd Mon, Home of Members, 10:30 a.m. 

OHARA SCHOOL OF IKEBANA. LA JOLLA 
Pres: Mrs. B. Donald Gaw 485-0116 
13 8 10 Tarn O'Shanter Ct. Poway 92064 

OHARA SCHOOL OF IKEBANA. SAN DIEGO 

Pres: Mrs. Walter Bourland 276-4667 
2936 Havasupai. San Diego 92117 

ORGANIC GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Patricia Tefft 422-3075 

81 "F" St. Chula Vista 92010 

3rd Fri. Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Frank Lapick 753-2892 
2602 La Gran Via. Carlsbad 92008 

PALOMAR DISTRICT. 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN CLUB, INC. 

Dir: Mrs. Alvin F. Putman 749-9587 
15665 FruitvaleRd.ValleyCenter 92082 

POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. G. Wm. Dunster 222-9690 
411 San Remo Way. San Diego 92106 
2nd Wed, Westminister Presby .Church 
Talbot & Cannon, 10:00 a.m. 

POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Kenneth Johns 74B-6324 
13321 Canyon B ack Ln. Poway 92064 
2nd Wed, Hally's Garden Room 
13519 Poway Rd, Poway, 9:00 a.m. 

SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Rhea Sands 465-3661 
5405 Baltimore Dr.#4.LaMesa 92041 
4th Tue, Home of Members, 9:30 a.m. 

SAN DIEGO BONSAI CLUB. INC. 

Pres: Mr. John Jackson 443-B716 
B67B Sky Rim Rd. Lakeside 92040 
2nd Sun. Casa del Prado, 1:00 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 
FOUNDATION. INC. 

Pres: Mr. Harry C. Haelsig 5B2-0536 
4750 - 55th St. San Diego 92115 
SAN DIEGO BROMELIAD SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Jack Percival 222-7327 
2711 Willow St, San Diego 92106 
1st Thurs. Byzantine Catholic Church 
2235 Galahad Rd.Serra Mesa, 8:00pm 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Photo by Bill Ross 



WILDERNESS GARDENS 



Dorothy Dudley Muth 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN AFICIONADOS are aware 
of the world famous 165 acre Descanso Gardens 
in La Canada, California, but how many know 
that its developer Manchester Boddy planted over 
100,000 camellias under a wild canopy of oaks 
and sycamores in northern San Diego County, 
west of the Palomar Mountain observatory? 

Located in a canyon approximately one 
mile wide and two and half long, the 584 acres 
that ribbon along the San Luis Rey River on the 
western rim of Pauma Valley, were planned to 
be Boddy's second botanical garden. 

The former owner of the Los Angeles Daily 
News called his retirement hideaway "Wilderness 
Gardens." Beginning in the mid-50's and for the 
next 15 years, Boddy planted rooted cuttings of 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



30 varieties of camellias among the magnificent 
stands of native trees. 

At the garden's peak it resembled a medieval 
tapestry. Beneath the cathedrallike oak and syca- 
more arches, among the verdant fern, the thousands 
of camellia bushes were an annual riot of pert 
pink, saucy red, opaline white, and blushing rose 
blossoms. 

Boddy installed greenhouses and an excellent 
irrigation system with a series of five ponds. 
Besides his dream of a camellia plantation, Boddy 
added such plants as shiny-leaved holly, varigated 
pittosporum, pampas grass, roses, fremontia, 
bottle brush, eucalyptus, pyracantha, and oleanders. 

When Boddy died in 1967 Wilderness Gardens 
was abandoned and the grounds and gardens, un- 

37 




Under a canopy of oak and sycamore trees some of Mr. Boddy's camellias can still 
be found. 



attended, slowly reverted to a wilderness where 
native creatures and vagrants roamed unheeded. 

Eyed by prospective developers for uses 
as diverse as a trailer park, a crash of condos 
to a golf course, concerned citizens set out to 
save Boddy's wilderness wonderland. 

A state-wide organization S.W.A.P. (Small 
Wilderness Area Preserves) formed a San Diego 
chapter during 1972-73. Its members performed 
the herculean task of raising $250,000 for an area 
few knew existed. The County of San Diego came 
up with matching funds to buy and preserve the 
beautiful, historical place. 

Before Boddy saw its potential, the area 
was already rich in history. According to San 
Diego's Museum of Man a series of petroglyphs 
above the preserve are archaeologically important 
and the ancient rock carvings are unusual for 
this far west. 

A Luiseno Indian trail through the canyon 
served as a link between inland and coastal settle- 
ments. Remains of the 1850-1861 Butterfield 
Stage spur can be seen, as well as the stone found- 
ation of San Diego County's first grist mill built 
in 1880. 

Prior to the opening of Wilderness Gardens 
Preserve to the public in 1983, San Diego County 
Park Ranger Torrey Lystra, with the help of the 
California Conservation Corp, probation personnel, 
and environmentally concerned volunteers, labored 
long and lovingly to unjungle the overgrowth, 
free the reed-choked first and second ponds, provide 

38 



12 walk-in tent sites, and clear paths through 
the canyon floor and to the two pastoral meadows 
above the canyon. 

Besides the resurrection of Boddy's legacy 
of cultivated flowers, there now is a legion of 
wild flowers poking their petals amid the native 
sugar brush, toyon, ceanothus, chamise, manzanita, 
and buckwheat. White and black sage add their 
heady fragrance to this geographical jewel. 

As Wilderness Gardens Preserve unfolds 
with its concept to develop a sanctuary where 
man can co-exist with wild life, 141 species of 
birds carol their pride in this unique area. Squirrels, 
desert cottontail rabbits, coyotes, bobcats, ring- 
tailed raccoons, opossums, mule deer, and a variety 
of reptiles are among the fauna happily sharing 
this hideaway with nature lovers. Wilderness 
Gardens epitomizes a forest wilderness where 
the universes of flora, fauna, and mankind are 
blossoming. 

Damselflies, dragon flies, and butterflies 
thread their spangled colors through the reed-looms 
along the two acre first pond where one can fish 
for bullhead catfish, large-mouthed bass, and 
bluegill. 

Horticulturalists remain astounded that 
despite the neglect of years, so many camellia 
bushes survived in the wild without water year 
after year. Boddy who was a camellia expert, 
developed some excellent stock and obviously 
did an exceptional job as 28 varieties have survived. 

There is still an arduous amount of work 

(Continued on Page 50) CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



^r (calendar oP S^oulh ^rtrican d3aiOi 



Text and ghost drawing by Karen Kees 



/\ 



A 



SPRING ARRIVES EARLY in my San Diego County 
garden. I live in a cold interior valley, with frequent 
frosts into March, yet winter growing South African 
bulbs will not wait. Around January 20th you 
will find me, on hands and knees, inspecting the 
freesias. I have been waiting for weeks. With 
a thrill I spot what I've been looking for — the 
first freesia bud. It emerges from a fan of sword-shaped 
leaves. This freesia bud is my Herald of Spring! 

By mid-February colorfully blooming freesias 
will highlight the garden. Their bell-shaped flowers 
come in yellow, white, rose, orange, or lavender. 
Even without their beauty and tolerant nature, 
freesia's spicy fresh scent would be reason enough 
to grow them. For years, the readily available 
freesias were the first South African bulbs to 
bloom in my garden. Recently, I have found the 
following species which beat the freesias by a 
month: Oxalis purpurea, Lachenolia aloides, Rom- 
ulea flava, Home.ria, a Moraea species, and Tul- 
boghia fragrans (a close relative of T. violacea 
the common society garlic). They are often in 
full bloom by mid-January. In fact, you can find 
South African bulbs blooming every month of 
the year. Most are perfectly suited to our Cal- 
ifornia climate. % 

Through March and into April sparax|sJ.V\ 
ixias, babianas, tritonias, plus a multitude of little 
known species compete for attention. Mostjareht— ■ 
brightly colored, many are adorned with exquisite 
markings, some like sparaxis (the harlequin flower) 
boldly combine both. As the sequence of bloom 
unfolds a treasure chest of charming flowers is 
opened. j^§T\ 

Ixia's wiry stems are impossibly slender 
and 18 inches to 3 feet tall. Although their stems 
are erect, they wave elegantly in a breeze. Their 
buds open in a progression from bottom to top, 
as do many South African bulbs. They share a 
trait with babianas, freesias, tritonias, and wat- 
sonias. As the top cluster of buds finish blooming 
secondary branches off the main stem, start opening 
buds. This delightful characteristic greatly extends 
the bloom season. Hybrid ixias come in many 
colors including cream, pale pink, cerise and la- 
vender, most with a dark blotch in the throat. 
The species, Ixia maculata, is a vibrant golden 
yellow and blooms earlier. yAV^ 

With the last of the freesias in late Marc 
babianas begin to bloom. My prolific hybrids ( 
are a lovely, clear blue. They beautifully compli 
ment the freesia's warm colors. Babiana's spring 
foliage is interesting; pleated, velvety leaves, 
and undulating stems. They are best planted behind 
later flowering plants; this hides their less than 
attractive summer foliage. Cut off the foliage 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 





as it browns in mid-summer. Babianas are one 
the few bulbs that tolerate wet ffoils, even clay. 
Surprisingly, they need to be dlMted 6 inches 
deep. Babianas are tough and||oJfc|rant, yet lovely. 

After the babianas burst into full bloom, 
in early April, the tritonias bloom! Tritonias 
are pure, brilliant orange, in fact their common 
name is flame freesia. When orange tritonias 
are planted in front of blue babianas,, an amazing 
spectacle occurs, the combination is intensely 
bright and beautiful. Hybrids of Tritonia crocata 
come in delicate pastels: peach, coral, pink and 
creamy yellow. Adding to their soft appearance 
is a transparent area near the center of each 
petal. Tritonias are wonderful as cut flowers 
and bloom ii^o/JWfey. w --"*<'/ J 

Although ixias, freesias, sparaxis, babianas 
and tritonias are all perfectly adapted to our 
climate, babianas and tritonias are rarely available 
locally. Fortunately some mail-order houses offered 
them last fall. Keep your eyes open this fall for 
a chance to acquire a few; they multiply rapidly. 
You'll love them. IrT^I 

Throughout the spring I impatiently await 
the first blooms of my seed-grown new species. 
Each year The Botanical Society of South Africa 
sends me seed of rare and endangered bulbs. 
It takes from six months to five years for seed 
grown South African bulbs to bloom. Sparaxis 
and freesia seed will bloom in April if sown in 
Octobeir^fegf^e^e^^^^^^ffifTw^or three 
years. I collect all the seed that sets and plant 
it in October. Most South African bulbs and seed 
require fall planting. 

By the end of April the main bloom of 
e South Afrfreg5I5iID5kteB^^i^ down, but the 
show never completely stop 



soe continued in next issue.) 



References recommended for further reading: 
"Bulbs, How To Select, Grow and Enjoy" by George 
Harmon. Aji^JdP^book. "Wildflowers of South 
Africa" by Sima Eliovson. Distributed by ISBS, 
nc., P.O. BojS^^SfSSaverton, OR 97075. For 
a jlst ofjaail-order sources, if not available in 
local nurseries, send a self-addressed stamped 
envelope to Karen Kees, 12819 Selma Court, Poway, 
CA 92064. 



Karen Kees is a professional artist, horticultural 
iter-illustrator and garden designer-consultant. 
'ren's^Sb'way, California, garden has been featur- 

in "Sunset," "San Diego Home-Garden," and 
"Better Homes and Garden's Country Home." 

Ghost drawing: Babiana blooms on the left; 
pitritonia stalk on the right. 

39 



BROMELIADS 



Masters of Versatility 



Linda Prell 




Aechmea fasciata variegata (foreground); 
Ananas bracteatus striatus (background). 
Photo by Bill Gunther 



DO YOU 'TOSS' a bromeliad plant once it finishes 
blooming and starts to show signs of decline? 
If you follow this practice you may dispose of 
a worthy plant just entering its most productive 
stage. 

Bromeliads were discovered in 
1493 by Christopher Columbus during his second 
trip to the New World. He returned with the 
now-popular pineapple. Bromeliads remained 
relatively unknown outside of Europe until 1950 
when the Bromeliad Society was established. 
They have been growing in popularity ever since 
due to their adaptability as these plants can 
adjust to artificial light, air-conditioning and 
abnormal amounts of moisture. They seem to 
thrive on neglect, a feature worth mentioning 
in today's fast-paced society. However, the 
most successful gardeners try to simulate the 
growing conditions of the plants natural habitat. 

Bromeliads are native to tropical 
America and grow wild from the southern part 
of the United States deep into South America. 
They can grow on trees (epiphytic), on rocks 
(saxicolous), or on the forest or desert floor 
(terrestials). They range in size from 1 inch 

40 



to 35 feet or more and can grow in altitudes 
from sea level to 14,000 feet. Bromeliads can 
be found in sea level jungles, mountain cloud- 
forests, low coastal slopes, and dry deserts. 

Over 2000 species and hundreds 
of varieties of bromeliads have been identified. 
Growers are hybridizing new varieties almost 
daily. Of course pineapple is the best known 
example followed closely by Spanish moss found 
in our Southern States. 

All bromeliads have scales on their 
leaves which serve as an absorption mechanism. 
They actually draw moisture out of the atmos- 
phere. The distribution of these scales causes 
the banding pattern seen on many plants, but 
they may also be hidden from view. 

Bromeliads usually take the form 
of a rosette of strap-shaped leaves that holds 
water in a cup in the center. Some leaves are 
tough and edged with spines, others are soft 
and pliable. Coloration can vary from pale yellow- 
green to almost black. The leaves may be banded, 
lined, mottled, or spotted. The design or striation 
may be white, gray, black, cream, purple, yellow, 
pink, or a combination of several shades. This 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



plant is a decorator's dream. 

Varying the light intensity can 
affect both the coloration and the shape and 
length of the leaves. I found this out the hard 
way. As a novice I was very proud of one plant 
that I had grown from an offshoot. It had lovely 
soft green leaves and looked, I thought, like 
a healthy specimen. It was only after contacting 
other growers that I learned that my plant should 
have been red. 

CULTURE 

WATERING 

Bromeliads that have soft, green 
leaves with a cup that holds water such as neo- 
regelias, vrieseas, guzmanias, and nidulariums 
usually need shade, humidity, and water in their 
cups. At all times they prefer a damp, but not 
soggy soil mix. 

Bromeliads with stiff succulent 
leaves without a place to hold water, such as 
dyckias, can withstand more light and periods 
of drying. 

Those plants usually covered with 
scales, such as tillandsias, and some of aechmeas 
and billbergias, need constant light. They should 
be misted frequently, but never soaked. These 
plants usually do better if allowed to dry out 
for a short time between waterings. 

TEMPERATURE 

In their natural habitats bromeliads 
can endure temperatures over 100° F. to near 
freezing. But, most prefer a night temperature 
no lower than 45° F. and day temperature in 
the 70's and 80's. 



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The arresting pink bract of Tillandsia cyanea rises 
from the heart of swordlike foliage. Delicate flowers 
are cornflower blue. 

bloom only once. The mother plant eventually 
dies within one to two years after flowering. 
Before dying, however, the mother plant sends 
out one or more offshoots from the base of the 
plant or from the arils of the leaves. These 
may be removed to make separate plants when 
they are at least one-third the size of the parent 
and have five leaves. They should be cut off 
with a sharp knife and planted separately. 



POTTING MIX 

Most bromeliads will grow in any 
light porous acid mix that holds the plant in 
place and drains immediately, and holds the 
plant in place. Fir bark and redwood bark are 
commonly used. Heavily scaled tillandsias do 
best in treefern fiber or mounted on cork bark, 
fern slabs, tree limbs and roots. 

FERTILIZER 

Since we have removed these plants 
from their natural environment we must provide 
the nutrients essential for growth. Some growers 
add time-release pellets to the potting mix, 
while others use a liquid fertilizer, spraying 
the foliage and the mix. It really does not matter 
which fertilizer is used as long as it is a weak 
solution applied at frequent intervals. 

BLOOMING 

To bloom a bromeliad requires 
a lot of patience. The blossom can take from 
one year to a dozen or more before appearing. 
Usually, under good conditions, aechmeas, bill- 
bergias, neoregelias, and vrieseas will flower 
in two years from an offshoot. Most bromeliads 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



One should not be discouraged 
if a plant does not survive. There are many 
growing conditions over which there is no control. 
If one plant fails, try another. You're bound 
to find one that will grow in your environment. 
There are hundreds of bromeliads that can be 
grown successfully without too much effort. 
Do not be afraid to experiment. If a plant is 
not doing well try fresh potting mix, a new loca- 
tion, or a different watering and feeding program. 

As with other species no two growers 
have the same techniques. Listen to the advice 
of fellow growers, but temper* it with your own 
experience relating to your situation. Remember 
that full sun in one garden is nowhere near the 
intensity of full sun in a different location. 
Experience is the best teacher so follow your 
own common sense in judging growing conditions. 

I hope you will derive as much 
pleasure from growing these "jungle gems" as 
I have. 



Linda Prell has successfully grown bromeliads 
for 10 years. She is an active member of the 
San Diego Bromeliad Society. 



41 



Transplanting Potted Houseplants 



Elizabeth B. Glover 



HOUSEPLANTS PURCHASED in tiny 2-inch pots 
will soon need to be transplanted. Sooner or later 
the roots of any plant in a container will fill all 
available space and become rootbound. Growth 
slows or stops and unless the plant is well watered 
and fed, it loses its vigor and may eventually 
die. 

There are some plants that bloom better 
and really thrive when their roots are crowded. 
If you purchase this type it is wise to remove 
it from its pot, check the root system, and re- 
plenish the soil with a planter mix that you consider 
appropriate. Repot it in the same container, 
not a larger one. 

Frequent repotting of houseplants is not 
necessary, and usually plants placed in containers 
5 inches or larger in diameter can stay in the 
same pots for from 12 to 18 months. Many house- 
plants, such as African violets, will thrive in pots 
that appear too small for them. 

Houseplants can be repotted at any season, 
although the best time is in the spring before 
the new growth appears. The roots then have 
time to become established in the new soil before 
winter. At other seasons, repotting may slow 
growth for a brief period, but eventually there 
will be a burst of activity again. 

Plants should be shifted to larger containers 
when they have completely filled their present 
container with their root system and/or the roots 
are protruding from the drainage hole. Select 
a proper-sized container, one which is large enough 
to provide for future root development, and which 
allows an inch or two of fresh soil on all sides 
of the root mass. If the pot is too large, the unused 
soil in the pot can become stagnant, and be a 
haven for potentially harmful organisms. 

Normally, the rule when repotting is to 
transplant to the next larger size container, such 
as from a 2-inch pot to a 4-inch pot. If you have 
a fast growing plant, skip one size and place the 
2-inch potted plant in a 6-inch pot. Two or three 
smaller plants may also be transferred to a 6-inch 
pot. Water a plant several hours before trans- 
planting so that the root ball will be moist. 

Always use a clean pot. If you do not have 
a new one, wash, scrub, and sterilize the old one. 
Use one part bleach to 9 parts of water to kill 
all diseases and insects. Cover the drainage hole 
of the pot with a shard, crock, screen, or stuff 
the hole with a tightly rolled piece of old nylon 
stocking. Select a good quality planter mix ap- 
propriate for the type of plant to be repotted. 

42 



The mix should provide good drainage and be porous 
enough to allow good root development. Moisten 
the planter mix, but do not let it get soggy. Partial- 
ly fill the container with moist planter mix. 

In order to remove the plant from the con- 
tainer, first loosen the planting mix around the 
edges of the pot with a knife and slide it out of 
the container. If it does not slip out easily, place 
one hand on top of the pot with the stem between 
the index and second finger. Grasp the bottom 
of the pot with the other hand, then invert and 
tap rim of the pot sharply against the edge of 
a potting bench or table. Lift pot off, steadying 
the root ball with one hand. If the roots are too 
crowded, gently loosen and spread them a little. 
Cut off any roots that twine around the root ball. 
Examine the root system by crumbling away the 
excess soil or planter mix. Healthy but crowded 
roots are an indication that the plant needs a 

larger container. A weak root system means 
that it should be replanted in a smaller container 
to encourage growth. If the plant's root ball appears 
compacted, vertically cut it with a very sharp 
knife, encourage roots to move out into new soil 
in the larger container. Make at least four equally 
spaced cuts about g to 1 inch deep, if practical. 

Place the root ball in the center of the 
root at the same depth it was in the original con- 
tainer. Add moist planter mix around the plant 
and fill to within one inch of the top. Press the 
mix down firmly to get the proper root contact. 

After moving a plant from one container 
to another, it is important to treat the plant with 
vitamin Bl to minimize shock to the root system 
and get the plant off to a stronger start by stimulat- 
ing rapid root development. 

Place the pot in a shallow plan of water 
and let it soak up moisture until the surface darkens 
and air bubbles stop rising. Remove from the 
pan and place pot in a saucer to drain excess water. 
Thereafter, it should be watered sparingly for 
a few weeks to encourage the roots to grow into 
the new soil. 

Most of the problems that affect houseplants 
can be attributed directly to improper watering 
practices. Overwatering and lack of sufficient 
drainage yield identical results — unhealthy plants. 
Excessive moisture in the root area saturates 
the air cells, thereby depriving the roots of the 
necessary oxygen and causing root rot, leaf diseases, 
defoliation, and eventually death. Plants need 
water to live, but do not want to be drowned. 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



There are two types of food for houseplants 
- one to promote blooms and the all-purpose type. 
Both are excellent and can be used every time 
you water during the growing season, or every 
three or four weeks when growth is slow. Many 
people use the fertilizer at quarter or half strength 
when they feed regularly. 

No general statement can be made about 
the proper amount of light, water needs, tempera- 
ture, or best humidity for houseplants. All of 
these factors must be considered in determining 
the best location for your house plant. 

Light is the energy source required by 
all green plants for proper function and growth 
of the leaf area. Some plants want more light 
than others. In general, flowering plants need 
considerable more light to bloom. Few can stand 
direct sunlight. Variegated foliage plants require 
more light than solid green plants. Almost every 
indoor plant likes some degree of sunlight. When 
the location of a plant is changed from sun to 
shade, shock may set in. It takes time to adjust. 
Try to avoid abrupt changes. To find the best 
location, it may be necessary to move the plant 
a few times. 

Determine the water needs of a plant. 
Does it need misting, a drying out period, or to 
be kept moist? 

Most homes keep their temperature and 
humidity range proper for humans to live in, but 
it is not necessarily proper for plants. Tropical 
indoor plants like humidity and often need misting. 
Do not overheat or chill plants. Also do not locate 
them near gas appliances, heater vents, or windows 
that are usually opened and shut. 

Houseplants depend entirely upon you for 
all their physical needs. Learn about their specific 
requirements early so that you can care for them 
correctly and enjoy their beauty as they mature 
into healthy, beautiful plants. 



Kyrckid ^fr 



rranaemen 



'f 



t 



Elizabeth Glover, a naval officer, has made garden- 
ing her pastime pleasure since her retirement 
ten years ago. She also grows many of her plants, 
both indoors and outdoors, in pots. 




A classic arrangement in an orchid show 
with cymbidiums, bare branches, and ligularia 
leaves (leopard plant). ©Photo by Asael Arce 



'Jjarott i>iwjatt 



1929-1985 



Sharon Siegan, writer, sculptor, and flower 
arranger shared her creative talents with California 
Garden and was a member of the publication board. 
She was a devoted writer of articles and book 
critiques since 1976. She is the author of the 
book "Torn Leaves." San Diego Floral Association 
feels a great loss. 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



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By Appointment 



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43 



Growing Plants From Seed 



Pat Bleecker 



SOWING SEEDS 

In advance of sowing gather together all 
of your equipment and then settle down for a 
pleasant time. For each packet of seed have 
a label and fill it out with the name and date 
and put it with the seed packet. Some years ago, 
Josephine Gray an expert gardener who grew 
almost everthing from seed, taught me the funda- 
mentals of sowing seeds for maximum germination. 
After one afternoon with her, she said, "I hope 
I haven't led you down the garden path about seed 
sowing. It isn't difficult and I don't even use in- 
cantations anymore!" [Ed: The late Josephine 
Gray wrote for this magazine for 10 years, primarily 
on herbs, her speciality.] 

Mrs. Gray used a soil mix given in the Royal 
Horticulture Society Journal many years ago, 
but in recent years vermiculite has been found 
to be much easier to use and equally satisfactory. 
Put vermiculite in a shallow container with drainage 
holes. (I use empty cherry tomato containers, 
used pony paks, etc.) One caution, do not be tempt- 
ed to reuse the vermiculite or soil for seeds; always 
use fresh sterile growing mediums. Use the once 
used medium for cuttings or as an additive to 
potted plants. Sprinkle the seeds on top of dry 
vermiculite and shake the container — all but 
the largest seeds will be covered nicely in this 
way — for larger seeds, sprinkle a little more 
vermiculite over the top. After the seeds are 
sown, place the container in a pan of water an 
inch or two deep and let the whole container become 
quite wet. Set it aside on a tray or cookie sheet 
and add the label immediately. Wait until the 
entire tray is complete before covering with glass 
and wet newspaper or cut up brown paper bags. 
Place the tray in a warm place and peek regularly; 
you want to be sure to uncover the plants just 
as soon as the seeds have germinated. Tall floppy 
seedlings often result when the cover is not removed 
soon enough. Extreme cases are difficult to correct. 

•As soon as a container is uncovered give 
it as much light, without direct sunlight, as you 
can. When the seedlings become larger move 
them into brighter quarters but never direct sun- 
light. They dry out too quickly and total wilt 
is total annihilation. I have a plant stand of two 
shelves which is covered with a plastic roofing. 
This allows a maximum of light without the burning 
rays of the sun. The baby plants need to be watched 
and given food common-sense care. They need 
to be turned as needed, that is, when they start 



leaning toward the light. This may vary with 
size and make up of individual plants. Do not 
use a formula, just use love. 

Vermiculite stays fairly damp without too 
much attention. If it jiggles when you pick it 
up and examine it, it is too dry. This is easily 
remedied by dipping the container into several 
inches of water for a few seconds. 

The first 'leaves' which appear are distinctive 
and often hint at the final pattern of the true 
leaf, but these first leaves are really cotyledons 
and you must wait until the second set or true 
leaves appear. When the true leaves are fully 
developed the plant is ready to be transplanted 




A bean just breaking ground. 



or pricked out, to use the gardener's term. The 
plant, if not too crowded, can stay in the container 
for a little while longer. Use your own judgement 
with regard to how crowded it is and how fast 
it grows. Some annuals change radically from 
day to day while some perennials change slightly 
from week to week. You will know. 



44 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



PRICKING OUT 

Plan ahead a bit and let the container with 
the plants ready to be pricked out become rather 
dry as the growing medium will not cling so tena- 
ciously to the roots and transplanting will not 
be such a shock. The advantage of vermiculite 
over a soil mix is that the roots are released 
ever-so-readily and do not get so tangled, but 
since the roots are not so protected by the soil, 
you must work quickly and in small amounts. 
If roots are exposed too long to drying winds, 
they will be lost no matter what you do. 

Potting-On Mix 

li tsp hydrated lime 
2 tbsp John Innes Base 
8 qts Super Soil 

John Innes Base 

2 parts hoof & horn 

2 parts 20% superphosphate 

1 part potash 

In a large pan, such as an old dishpan, mix 
the soil with the chemicals. When thoroughly 
mixed, add water until the mix is moist, but not 
so moist that it is mud. Line a wooden flat with 
newspaper, two layers are best, and fill with the 
soil mix. (It will take more than one large pan 
full to fill a flat.) Spread the soil carefully to 
all corners and tamp down with a block of wood 
or a small bread board. Press down firmly so 
there are no air pockets. 

Choose a day when there is not a strong 
drying wind. Cover a table with a slick-surface 
material, such as an old shower curtain. Work 
sitting down if possible, this is slow careful work, 
especially if you have a whole flat to do. Start 
with a small container of seedlings, loosen and 
remove a few of them with a plastic fork. Scoop 
up the seedlings and let them drop from about 
a foot above the table. When they drop, they 
will slightly unravel so when they are pulled apart, 
the roots will not be damaged as much as they 
would be without the dropping process. 

Carefully prick out one seedling at a time 
and use the leaves as a handle, not the stem. 
The stem is so tiny that it is possible to pinch 
it right off. Use a pointed dibble stick to make 
a proper size hole. Sometimes it is practical 
to make a lot of holes in rows at one time. Place 
the tiny plant in the hole and use the stick, or 
your fingers in some cases, to be sure the soil 
is pressed down around the roots. This is very 
important so there are no air pockets to dry out 
the roots. 

Continue to plant in neat rows at evenly 
spaced intervals. Use your own judgement as 
to spacing, always at least 2 inches apart, but 
seldom farther than 3 inches. When the flat is 
finished, spray the seedlings with a sprayer filled 
with a very weak solution of liquid fertilizer or 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



vitamin B solution; this helps to reduce transplant 
shock. Put the flat for a day or two in a sheltered 
place with less sunlight than the seedlings have 
had, then move to filtered light. Do not forget 
to use your labels. When finishing out a row with 
another kind of plant, mix the plants so that those 
with similar leaves are not next to each other. 
Give yourself all the help you can. 

Often I find it convenient to do the pricking 
out into small containers, depending on how many 
seedlings I am handling at that time. The only 
difference is that when the containers are filled, 
I set them into deep pans of weak fertilizer solution 
and let them become saturated before I set them 
in a shady place. This method of watering is a 
bit easier for me than spraying the large flat. 
In either case do not let the seedlings ever dry 
out completely; it is virtually impossible to water 
them properly when this happens. If they are 
where you can see them often, you are reminded 
to keep them moist, not wet. 

When it is time for the plants to go into 
the garden or into pots, depending on their type 
and ultimate use, it is best if they can be exposed 
to brighter light for a day or so. This can be a 
nuisance sometimes since they tend to dry out 
so quickly, but I think it is worth the time. When 
you are ready to put them into the open garden, 
they are ready for the move. After transplanting, 
water with a weak fertilizer solution or a vitamin 
B solution and cover for a day or two, depending 
on the weather. You can use bushel baskets, if 
they still exist, plastic pots, or whatever, just 
be sure you do not bake them — the idea is protec- 
tion, not torture. 

This is a specific branch of the gardening 
hobby that some of us prefer above all others. 
It is clearly not worth your while to raise ordinary 
things which are readily and inexpensively available 
in pony paks, but it is great fun to raise the more 
unusual or expensive plants and even greater fun 
to share your overflowing bounty with friends. 
The whole process is simple and satisfying. It 
is really much more complicated on paper than 
in the doing. Happy growing. 

[Ed: See "Know Your Seedlings" - 
March-April 1984 issue. 
Pages 55-57.] 



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45 



FLAT-TOPPED BUCKWHEAT 



Text and Drawing bv Thomas A. Oberbauer 

Mm 



V 



ONE OF THE most widespread native plants 
in California is the flat-topped or California 
buckwheat Eriogonum fosciculotum. According 
to Munz's California Flora, it can be found growing 
from Central California to Baja California and 
from the coast to Utah. In southern California, 
flat-topped buckwheat is one of the dominant 
plants in the Coastal sage scrub vegetation com- 
munity, but it also inhabits desert slopes and 
montane communities up to 4000 feet in elevation. 

Flat-topped buckwheat is a small to 
medium sized shrub with small green, almost 
needlelike leaves and white flower clusters that 
grow into flattened heads. Following ample 
winter rainfall, the flowers will be profuse during 
June and July, sometimes appearing as though 
a lace tablecloth has been draped over the plants. 
Later, the flower heads usually remain on the 
plants, but turn a dark rust-brown color. 

While in flower, flat-topped buckwheat 
is an important plant for bees. It was partially 
responsible for making southern California a 
prominent honey producing region during the 
latter part of the last century. 

The wild buckwheat genus of about 
150 species is predominantly a western North 
American group of plants. This group contains 
a variety of forms from thread-stem annuals 
to large bushy shrubs, and buckwheat species 
can be found from the tops of the highest moun- 
tains above tree line, down to the lowest deserts. 

There are a number of buckwheats 
that are used in ornamental horticulture. Many 
people are familiar with the silver-leaved Saint 
Catherine's lace, Eriogonum giganteum, which 
is a native ornamental from Santa Catalina Island. 
Another buckwheat used in native plant gardens 
in California is the low growing Conejo buckwheat, 
Eriogonum crocatum, a shrub from Ventura County 
with sulphur colored flowers. 

The flat-topped buckwheat is just 
one of the common plants that are too often 
considered brushy weeds. In reality, it has ir- 
replaceable value as wildlife habitat, a food 
plant for native animals and as an important 
part of our natural landscape. 





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46 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



SOME 
KENYA 
TREES 



Text & Photos by 
Thomas W. Whi taker 






Fig. 1 Adansonia digitata , the beobab damaged by fire and elephants. 



IN AUGUST, 1983, my wife and I had the privilege 
of visiting Kenya, one of the small East African 
countries about the size of Texas. Within this 
modest space, however, are a multitude of land- 
scapes and habitats not duplicated elsewhere 
in the world in such a relatively small area. In 
spite of the fact it sits astride the equator, Kenya 
includes snow-covered Mt. Kenya. At 17,058 
feet, this magnificent peak is higher than any 
found in the Rockies or Alps. In addition, there 
are harsh deserts, rain forests, enormous lakes, 
vast swamps, and volcanoes. The area we visited 
was mostly in Central and Southern Kenya. 

Kenya is noted for its numerous and diverse 
populations of wild animal species. These animals 
are mostly confined to a series of twenty National 
Parks. The diverse habitats mentioned provide 
for a flora that is no less varied than the animal 
population. 

There are three species of trees, numerically 
not large, that dominate most landscapes of Kenya. 
They are: Adansonia digitata Linn. - the Beobab 
(Fam. Bombacaceae); Euphorbia candelabrum 
Trem. ex Kotschy (Fam. Euphorbiaceae); and 
Hyphaene coricea Gaetn. the Doum Palm or Ginger- 
bread Palm (Fam. Palmaceae). 

Adansonia digitata 

The branches are stout and stiff; the leaves 
are digitate, petiolate (5 inches long). The flowers 
are large, white, solitary, pendulous, and peduncles 
about twice the length of the leaves. There are 
5 leathery, reflexed petals. The fruits are large, 
oblong, woody and filled with pulp. 

The bulky trunk of the beobab (Figure 1) 
consists of very soft wood, useless for lumber, 
but it has been used with fair success to make 
paper. Unfortunately, the beobab is being decimat- 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



ed by numerous elephant herds. These huge animals 
tear large hunks of the soft wood from the trees, 
apparently for food. The result is severe damage 
and eventual death of the tree. Torn and mangled 
trees are frequent. The older trees evidently 
provide choice tidbits for the hungry, unrestrained 
pachyderms. 

Trees damaged by fire often serve as a 
nesting place for insects, frequently bees. Natives 
plunder these natural hives for honey. The bees 
are stupefied or rendered less ferocious by smolder- 
ing elephant dung, and the honey retrieved. 

The leaves of the beobab can be used as 
a vegetable according to some authorities. Dale 
and Greenway (1961) say the fruit and seed pulp 
are also edible. The fruit, properly processed, 
produces a cool drink and a dye is obtained from 
the roots. The species is found from sea level 
to elevations of about 4000 feet. 

Hyphaene coricea 
Hyphaene is a small genus of dioecious 
(the fruits are borne only on the female plants) 
palms, with dichotomously (repeatedly forking 
in pairs) branched trunks (Figure 2). Branching 
of mature plants is rare among palms and immediate- 
ly attracts attention. Oddly, the young plants 
are unbranched. The trunks of most of the have 
been blackened by fire, but apparently the trees 
suffer no ill effects from destruction of the older 
dried leaves. Dale and Greenway's authoritative 
"Kenya Trees and Shrubs" states that the leaves 
produce a useful fiber for making baskets, mats, 

and roof thatching. The fruits/are eaten by eleph- 
ants. By so doing, these animals act as an agent 
of dispersal. The seeds are very hard and may 
be used as a substitute for ivory. 

The trees of H. coricea we saw were located 

47 




Fig. 2 Hyphaena coricea , the doum palm 
growing along water course. 




$&* : *«-^ 



m* 



^i'?*'- 




Fig. 3 Euphorbia candelabrum growing roadside 
in dry savannah-thornbush area. 



along water courses. We estimated some of the 
taller trees at about 50 feet in height. They branch 
a maximum of 4 times by the equal growth of 
an auxiliary bud. 

Burkill (1966) reports that the seeds of 
the doum palm are the commonest objects found 
in Egyptian tombs during the reign of the Pharoahs. 
It is also known as the gingerbread tree because 
the thick, fleshy, fibrous parts of the fruits resemble 
gingerbread in taste and color. The seeds are 
extremely hard and can be crafted into beads 
and buttons. 

These unique and interesting palms deserve 
to be widely grown in California. They would 
add an attractive element to our already diverse, 
introduced palm flora. 

Euphorbia candelabrum 

This large, treelike Euphorbia is a common 
sight in East Africa (Figure 3). It grows from 
sea level to about 6000 feet. The trees are mostly 
solitary, and occur in savannah thornbush country, 
frequently on termite mounds. 

Euphorbia candelabrum is a conspicuous 
sight in the savannah. It attains a height of up 
to 50 feet, and may be 3 feet in diameter. The 
distinguishing feature of E. candelabrum is the 
crowded mass of candelabralike upright branches. 

Where every plant in the dry savannah-thorn- 
bush flora is subject to grazing (mostly over-grazing) 
by the large mammal population, E. candelabrum 
leads a charmed life, probably because of the 
spiny branches and toxic qualities of the vegetative 
parts of the plants. The toxin is apparently con- 
centrated in the milky latex which flows freely 
wherever the branches are wounded. 

The toxic properties of the latex were 
displayed to spectacular advantage in a recent 
popular movie, "The Gods Must Be Crazy" where 
one of the bad guys was rendered harmless by 
drippings of the latex of a wounded Euphorbia 
(purposely by the hero). The latex, which can 
be removed easily with water, can cause temporary 
blindness and severe skin irritation. 



Ref: Dale, Ivan R. and P.J. Greenway. 1961. 
"Kenya Trees and Shrubs." Nairobi. Kenya Estates 
Limited, in assoc. with Hatchards, London. 
Burkill, I.H. 1966. "A Dictionary of the Economic 
Products of the Malay Peninsula." Vol. l(A-H): 
1237-1238. Govts, of Malaysia & Singapore; Kuala 
Lampur, Malaysia. 



Dr. Whitaker is Plant Geneticist, U.S. Department 
of Agriculture and Research Associate in Biology, 
University of California, San Diego Campus. 



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El Cajon, CA 92021 

(619) 447-4922 

10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
(Closed Mondays) 



Mary E. Hardgrove 
Prop. 



Donald L. Hardgrove 
Hybridist 



48 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 






by Carol Greentree 



March, 1935 



CACTUS DISPLAY PLANNED FOR EXPOSITION 

Further information regarding the cactus 
display for the California Pacific Exposition at 
San Diego has been received from Miss Kate 
Sessions, who writes: 

"The permanent cactus display that is to 
be established on the west side of the New Mexico 
Building in Balboa Park will be the first general 
display in the open ground throughout the year 
in the United States of America, or even the world. 
This display will keep on growing and will be well 
cared for in Balboa Park. Everyone should enjoy 
making at least one donation of at least three 
[plants] of one species to help the cause. The 
various states will have individual displays of 
their native varieties. Due credit will be given 
every donor and a list of species planted will be 
published." 

[Ed: The above mentioned cactus display was 
abandoned, but Miss Kate Sessions would be 
delighted with the cacti and succulent garden 
that is thriving today along the east side of Park 
Blvd. in Balboa Park, San Diego, California.] 



k , H K. 



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1985 All-American Rose Selection 

'Showbiz' is the only rose to win the AARS 
award in 1985. This floribunda has large, long 
lasting clusters of scarlet-red blooms 2l to 3 
inches in diameter from spring until late fall. 
The buds open to scarlet red and hold that color 
throughout their life cycle on the bush or as cut 
flowers. 

The broad compact bushes of medium height, 
about 3 feet, have dark glossy green foliage and 
is reported to be mildew resistant. A.M. 




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VISTA, CALIF. 92083 
Phoner (619) 941-3613 



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and garden, featuring the world's 
largest selection of begonias and 
gesneriads. Come visit us, or send 
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from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM; other 
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MARCH-APRIL 1985 



49 



(Continued from Page 38) 

to be done — reestablishing the greenhouses, propa- 
gation of the camellias, and restoration of the 
original ponds and irrigation systems. The creation 
of an educational and interpretative exhibit is 
planned, as well as improvements to the camping 
areas and trails. 

John Muir sensitively wrote, "The clearest 
way into the universe is through a forest wilder- 
ness." 



Dorothy Dudley Muth, a long-time resident of 
San Diego, California, has been active in civic 
projects to beautify and save its heritage. She 
is a charter member of Friends of Wilderness 
Gardens, The Committee of 100, and S.W.A.P. 



Wilderness Gardens is located 45 miles north of 
San Diego. From 1-15 it is W miles east of S76 
to the park entrance. Open 7 7 months of the 
year, daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the Pre- 
serve is closed in August. There is a small parking 
fee for this gem of a walk-in wilderness. For 
futher information write to: Friends of Wilderness 
Gardens, %The San Diego County Park Society, 
P.O. Box 957, Bonita, CA 92002-0830. 




'MHI TO HIGHWAY 7« 



MAP BV SHAFFER 

F«OM .SKETCH 

ftV TDRM Y LYSTRA 

© WA.T«flt • toiuct 



The camellias Mr. Boddy planted 30 
years ago that have survived without care 
for the last 15 years are listed below in 
the order they are growing along the tour 
trail : 

'Jenny Jones' 

'Kumasaka' 

'Lotus' 

'Ragland' 

'Eureka Red' ('Sensation') 

'Prince Eugene Napoleon' (Pope Pious) 

'Alba Plena' 

'Herme' 

'Marceila Hovy' 

'Mrs. Charles Cobb' 

'Berenice Boddy' 

'Magnoliiflora' 

'Chandleri Elegans' 

'Francine' 

'Mercury' 

'Purity' 

'Eureka' var. 

'Cheerful ' 

'Mathotiana Alba' 

Camellia sasanqua (UNK) 

C_. pitardii (UNK) 

'Jean May' 

'CM. Hovey' ('Colonel Firey') 

'Shiro Chan' 

'Covina' 

'Pink Perfection' 

'Debutante' 






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to your every garden need. 

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We Specialize in Indoor Plants 



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San Diego, CA 92110 
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50 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



^Jne KJreatedt 



i*\efredltmentd to ^Jhe Spirits of- if Ian 



Drawing 
courtesy of 
American Assoc, 
of Nurserymen 




CIRCUMSTANCES HAVE FORCED me to live 
in an apartment the past few years. Often, when 
I feel cramped, I reflect on gardens I have tended, 
and realized that as I mature my understanding 
and appreciation of gardens grows broader, bearing 
a more philosophic fruit. 

My earliest gardening experience 
was quite narrow. More than twenty years ago, 
when I was nine, I asked my parents to let me 
take care of part of the yard of our house in 
suburban Los Angeles. The plot they gave me 
was not much, the side of the house that received 
little sunlight. 

The ferns and callalilies did not 
need any care. Few weeds grew, only a few 
sprouts that I thought came from seeds dropped 
by a small broad-leaved tree growing next to 
the house. I plucked the sprouts whenever they 
appeared. Other than that there was nothing 
to do except sit on my plot of land where it was 
cool and quiet, and look out toward the street. 

My family soon moved from that 
house to Fresno (California) and my attention 
was diverted to other causes — baseball and girls. 
During adolescence, I worked in the yard grudging- 
ly. In my early twenties, though, I fell under 
the spell of Thoreau and the romantic appeal 
of the soil. I became a professional gardener, 
driving a pickup laden with clippings, pulling 
a trailer full of equipment, following a steady 
route, mowing lawns and pruning bushes. I moved 
into a small house with a large yard. In the back- 

MARCH-APRIL 1985 



yard were fruit trees — apricot, plum, peach, 
nectarine, orange, tangerine — which I kept pruned 
small so the fruit would be large and sweet, 
and so the trees would not block the sunlight 
from reaching the grass and the vegetable beds. 
These beds were strips between the lawn and 
the fence, and in them I grew beans, squash, 
cucumbers, corn, eggplant, tomatoes, and lettuce. 
Every year I looked forward to spring, when 
I spread compost over the soil, raked it smooth, 
formed furrows, sowed seeds. Everyday I inspected 
my garden, looking at the flowers and fruit of 
the trees, the vegetable plants as they grew 
tall and spread over the soil. 

Occasionally I abandoned my work 
and my garden to backpack in the Sierras. I 
hiked up slopes scattered with granite boulders, 
through forests of sugar pine, white fir, incense 
cedar, red fir, and yellow pine. I climbed atop 
ridges, and looked for miles down valleys and 
ravines, and over the tops of treeless peaks. 
Everything was huge and mysterious. There 
was beauty, but no control. Once I strayed off 
the trail and was lost. Only by hiking along a 
creek for two hours, making my own trail among 
steep boulders, through thick forests, did I find 
my way back to the trail. At times I was scared. 
Another time, at night, snug in my sleeping bag, 
I awoke to the patter of rain on my face. Even 
during pleasant hours hiking, looking for flowers 
and birds, an uneasiness crept at the back of 
my mind. Though I believed I had entered a 

51 



world of purity, uncorrupted by the evils of human- 
ity, I also sensed a threat in the Sierras. It wild- 
ness, lack of human control, attracted me; but 
at the same time this wildness and sublimity 
overwhelmed and frightened me. After two 
or three days I was ready to return to my garden 
and its benevolent mysteries. 

The plants, though in need of water, 
thrived while I was gone. That they grew by 
their own code, but where I planted them, requiring 
my care, was a great satisfaction to me. I complain- 
ed, though, that my garden, confined by the 
city, was cramped, and I dreamed of having a 
large one in an open space. In his essay, "Of 
Gardens," Francis Bacon outlines his ideal garden, 
giving it the princely size of thirty acres. His 
garden, unlike mine, produced no food. It was 
built strictly for the pleasure of those who walked 
in it. Carefully proportioned, it was divided 
into three sections — the green, the main garden, 
and the heath. Bacon recommended that the 
garden not be cluttered, that there be spacious 
walkways, open spaces, and hills for elevated 
vistas. He included much details as arches, hanging 
plates of colored glass, cages of birds, and flowing 
fountains. He suggested that flowers be scattered 
on the walkways, to be crushed underfoot so 
their fragrance would perfume the air. Bacon's 
garden was a place of sensory delight isolated 
from both untamed nature and corrupt civilization. 
Writing when he was — at the end of the Medieval 
era, before reason and science displaced revealed 
religion* — the pleasures Bacon championed 
did not end with the senses, but stretched higher, 
to the contemplation of the divine. From the 
overall design to the smallest detail, Bacon's 
plan takes into account the harmony and beauty 
believed to come from God. The geometric 
proportions — the square and the circle — were 
derived from the platonic forms of divinity. 
The arched hedges raised one's eyes to God; 
the colored glass were ornaments reflecting 
God's beauty; the caged birds sang the harmony 
of God. Bacon said that gardens by their nature 
are good, for the first garden — Eden — was made 
by God for man's pleasure. 

Sitting in the backyard of my home 
on spring afternoons I believed in the goodness 
of gardens. I may not have believed in God or 
platonic ideals, but I understood that the pleasure 
of the neat rows of vegetables, the fragrance 
of the fruit blossoms, and the songs of birds 
were more than sensory delights. Bacon said 
that a garden is "the greatest refreshment to 
the spirits of man." I felt refreshed. Although 
I may explain spirit in psychological rather than 
metaphysical terms, what Bacon suggested about 
a garden and what I felt in my garden are similar. 
By imposing Bacon's design on nature, men strolled 
in the midst of a harmony and beauty derived 
from God. They were refreshed by drawing nearer 
to God. By tending a garden, I worked among 
fruit trees and vegetable plants, derived from 




Photo by Peter Richards 



nature, ordered by a human being. I was refreshed 
by joining my hands in partnership with the earth. 

*Revealed religion: A belief that the deity had 
revealed himself and his will to his creatures. 



Wes Beal has perfected the art of enjoying his 
garden and nature. 




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52 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




IN THE FALL THESE EXQUISITE 4- TO 6-INCH 
BLOSSOMS COVER THE ENTIRE CROWN FOR FOUR 
TO SIX WEEKS. Photo by Larry Pautler 



THE FLOSS-SILK TREE 



Bill Gunther 



Augustin Francois Cesar Prouvencal De Saint 
Hilaire was the name of a French botanist who 
lived from 1779 to 1853d. To save space, the 
eminent botanical reference book Hortus Third 
uses the nickname, "St.-Hil" when referring to 
this botanist. We will do the same. 

St.-Hil had a close friend, an artist, 
named Louis Choris, who was very handsome. 
So when St.-Hil needed a generic name for a 
newly-found very handsome tree with beautiful 
blossoms, he decided to name the genus Chorisio, 
in honor of his friend. Maybe it was an expression 
of love. 

Chorisia speciosa, the floss-silk 
tree, is the most beautiful species in its genus. 
Variable 4- to 6-inch blossoms in light orchid-pink, 
purplish-rose, mulberry and burgundy burst sudden- 
ly from upright ball-like buds and cover the entire 
crown looking gay and springlike in the autumn 
landscape. One color dominates each tree, appear- 



ing on the outer edges of the widely separated 
petals. Its common name is derived from the 
flossy-silky parachutes which carry the seeds 
away with the wind. The large seed pods may 
be harvested before they open. After discarding 
the pod shells the silky seed floss makes an excel- 
lent pillow stuffing. This tree is native to interior 
Brazil and Argentina, where even now the native 
Indian tribesmen use the lance-straight trunks 
of this tree for making dugout canoes for travel 
along the rivers which are the only existing "roads" 
in much of that area. The natives also use the 
very tough fibers of the inner bark for making 
the rope which holds together the beams of their 
jungle houses. 

Maybe you do not need a dugout 
canoe, a jungle shack, or a homemade pillow. 
But if you do need a truly dramatic central focal 
point for your garden, the floss-silk tree will 
serve your purpose well. It performs beautifully 
in the coastal areas of central and southern Califor- 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



53 




SPINES ON THE TRUNK OF THE FLOSS-SILK TREE, 
CHORISIA SPECIOSA . Photo by Bill Gunther 



nia and it will provide abundant topics of conversa- 
tion for your garden guests. These topics include 
the beautiful blossoms, the horrible looking horns 
which stud the tree trunk, the flossy seed parachutes 
flying away, and also the unique light green fingerlike 
leaves which sometimes, without warning, all 
fall within a day or two, leaving the tree bare 
for a few weeks. 

The blossom color of the typical 
floss-silk tree is a combination of white, cream, 
and rose. If you prefer wine-red colored blossoms, 
ask your nurseryman to obtain the grafted selection 
'Los Angeles Beautiful.' Another available selec- 
tion is 'Majestic Beauty,' which has blooms of 
a rich pink color. 

These trees grow fast the first 
few years, slowing conveniently before reaching 
30 to 60 feet. Their grass-green trunk turns 
gray as the tree matures. 

Plant a young tree in a location 
which provides full sun, excellent drainage, and 
plenty of room to grow. Give it a good soaking 
once a month. Nothing more will it ask. 



ERRATA 

JAN-FEB 1985 Issue: 

Page 10 - Correct "CHUM RUOT" to "KHO QUA." 

(Under left illustration) 

Page 11 - Correct "FIG is the symbol of reputation." 

to "FIG is the symbol of prosperity." (Pineapple 

is the symbol of reputation.) 




Reviewed by Barbara Jones 



INSECTS OF THE WORLD by Anthony Wootton. 
1984, Blandford Press, Ltd., Facts on File, Inc., 
460 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. $17.95, 
9lX6? in., hardback, 224 pages. 

It is not difficult for a gardener to accept 
the fact that there are nearly one million recognized 
species of insects occupying every conceivable 
habitat. Over three-fourths of the world's living 
creatures are insects. The way that insects have 
adapted to their environment is truly remarkable. 

By reading this book one will find that 
there is no such thing as a typical insect. One 
of the most interesting chapters is about insects 
and their relationships with man. 

Naturalist Wootton has illustrated this 
fascinating, readable book with many excellent 
drawings and photographs, in both color and black 
and white. 

This attractive book would be an excellent 
addition to anyone's personal library or would 
make a fine gift for a gardening friend. 



SPIDERS OF THE WORLD by Rod and Ken Preston- 
Mafham. 1984, Bradford Press, Ltd., Facts on 
File, Inc., 460 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. 
$17.95, 9iX64 in., hardback, 191 pages. 

Although few spiders are dangerous to 
man, they are often associated with witches, 
poisonous appetites, and bad luck. Spiders have 
become a part of folk mythology and legends 
in many parts of the world. Did you know Little 
Miss Muffet actually existed and was probably 
the daughter of Thomas Muffet, a spider enthusiast? 
Gardeners have learned to value spiders, but most 
poeple do not appreciate these misrepresented 
creatures. 

The elaborate courtship rituals, mating, 
life histories, defense mechanisms, and hunting 
techniques of the many different spiders are fasci- 
nating. 

Rod Preston-Mafham is a zoologist and 
his brother Ken is a professional wildlife photo- 
grapher. They have combined their skills in this 
interesting, extensively illustrated book with 
64 color and 45 black and white photographs and 
29 illustrations. Although this book probably 
will not make one a spider lover, it is an attractive 
and very readable book which would be a fine 
addition to anyone's gardening library. 



54 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



YOU ARE INVITED TO SUBSCRIBE TO 

California. 

GARDEN 

magazine Since 1909 

The perfect gift to a friend, relative or neighbor! 

1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $4.00 

2 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $7.50 



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San Diego Floral Association 

Casa del Prado, Balboa Park 

San Diego, CA 92101 



GARDEN STUDY COURSE IV 

The fourth in a series of garden classes 
designed by the National Council of State Garden 
Clubs and sponsored locally by the San Diego 
Floral Association will be offered on two 
consecutive Saturdays, March 16 and 23, 1985. 
Classes will be held in the San Diego Floral 
Association Library, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, 
San Diego, California. 

Sheri Holladay, Bob Murphy, and Gary 
Stromberg will be the instructors. Subjects to 
be covered include techniques for growing trees 
and shrubs, techniques for growing fruit, water 
conservation through use of native plants, plant 
identification, and specialized gardening. 

Students successfully completing the four 
classes in the series will receive a Garden 
Consultant Certificate issued by the National 
Council of State Garden Clubs. The classes are 
also open to those who do not desire certification. 



DID YOU KNOW There are ten common names 
for Epipremnum aureum ; pothos, golden pothos, 
pothos vine, taro vine, devil's ivy, Solomn Island 
ivy, hunter's robe, golden hunter's robe, variegated 
philodendron, golden creeper, and ivy arum. 



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MARCH-APRIL 1985 



55 



Book £ 



eviews 

Reviewed by Allethe Macdonald 

Blandford Gardening Handbooks - GARDEN PLAN- 
NING & DESIGN. GARDEN CONSTRUCTION. 
GREENHOUSES, CLOCHES, <5c FRAMES all by 

Peter McHoy, 1984. Blandford Press, Link House, 
West Street, Pool Dorset, BH15 ILL. Distributed 
by Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., Two Park Ave., 
New York, NY 10016. Each book $6. 95 (US), 
$8.95 (Can.), 5 3/4X7 3/4 in. paperback, 128 
pages. 

GARDEN PLANNING <5c DESIGN. McHoy, a well- 
known gardening consultant and horticultural 
writer gives easy to follow advice on every facet 
of garden design to make the most of any garden 
plot. He discusses analysing your plot before 
drawing up definite plans for paths and drives; 
fences, walls, and gates; hedges, patios and paved 
areas; raised beds; water gardens; kitchen gardens; 
children's gardens, etc. He devotes 38 pages to 
"Ideas to Follow" with photographs and graphics. 
Excellent illustrations are used throughout the 
book. A section with text and charts gives descrip- 
tions of all kinds of plants, their height and spread, 
soil and sun suitability, and even plants that will 
grow in the cracks of pavement. 

GARDEN CONSTRUCTION. In this book McHoy 
gives clear concise instructions for the actual 
construction of the garden from site preparation 
to making a lawn and flower beds, to building 
a fence or a wall, and hanging a gate. There are 
longer chapters on making a patio and on paths 
and drives which cover laying and finishing concrete 
or bricks and the materials needed. The carefully 
selected color photographs, and illustrations guide 
the gardener in accomplishing all the plans discussed 
in GARDEN PLANNING & DESIGN. 

GREENHOUSES, CLOCHES <5c FRAMES. In the 

first chapter one reads: "Although a greenhouse 
is not expensive when you take into account the 
hours of enjoyment to be gained... It makes sense 
to choose carefully... If you decide what you 
want from your greenhouse before you go shopping 
for it, the range will seem much less bewildering, 
and it will be easier to compare models within 
the range that is right for your purpose." McHoy 
then discusses: aids and equipment; heating and 
insulation, culture of plants, propagation, and 
pests and diseases. 

A third of the book, with illustrations, 
is devoted to the selection, care, and propagation 
of greenhouse plants, both ornamental and those 
grown for food. 



i'^Aa. 4^JU Mi 




a/W/ 




56 



GROW YOUR OWN HEALTH FOODS by Roy 

Genders, 1984, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., Two 
Park Ave., New York, NY 10016, 6 X 9 in. paper- 
back, $6.95 (US), $8.95 (Can.), 159 pages. 

The author discusses briefly food require- 
ments for a healthy body before giving basic instruc- 
tions for preparing the garden soil, germination 
time of vegetable seeds, and a sowing and harvesting 
chart for a year's supply of food. 

A brief discussion of the food value, how 
to plant, and when to harvest is given for each 
of the foods listed, which are divided into categor- 
ies: vitamin rich vegetables for winter use; the 
valuable root crops; salads; summer vegetables; 
sprouting seeds; herbs and fruits. 

Simple concise information for anyone 
interested in growing these foods, including sugges- 
tions of ways to grow them in window boxes, hanging 
baskets, tubs, and sheds and cellars are given. 

Also an interesting book for armchair read- 
ing. 

GARDEN CONIFERS. HEATHERS. Both books 
by Brian & Valerie Proudley. Blandford Press, 
Link House, West Street, Poole Dorset, BH15 
ILL. Distributed in US by Sterling Publishing 
Co., Inc., Two Park Ave., New York NY 10016, 
5X7i in. hardback, $9.95 (US), $12.95 (Can.). 

GARDEN CONIFERS, printed in 1984, 
216 pages. 

To quote the Proudley's, "The conifers 
described in these pages can provide, either alone 
or in compnay with other plants, all the components 
to create a garden as pretty as a picture." They 
deal with a wide choice of conifers available to 
the gardener and full details of planting and propa- 
gation are given, together with the suitability 
to different soils and climatic variations in the 
temperate zone for over 500 cultivars. There 
are 118 color photographs, each depicting conifers 
of different ages and types; many are close-ups 
of individual branches which make identification 
easier. 

A pocket-size book that could easily be 
carried, when visiting parks and gardens, for iden- 
tifying and choosing conifers for one's own garden. 

HEATHERS, reprinted 1983, 191 pages. 

Brian & Valerie Proudley working with 
the Heather Society of Great Britian, have written 
this handbook with 64 pages of color photographs, 
seasonally arranged, illustrating the variation 
of heathers in their annual cycle. They have grown 
heathers in their own garden for many years and 
much of their information was researched in their 
own plantings. The uses, cultivation requirements, 
color grouping suggestions, and propagation are 
all discussed in an easy style. A comprehensive 
description of 350 cultivars, often with line draw- 
ings, completes the handbook. 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



A BOOK OF WILDFLOWERS by William A. Niering, 
111. by Anita Marci, 1984. William Morrow & Co., 
Inc., 105 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016, 
4iX6i in. hardback, $10.00, 128 pages. 

Niering, Prof, of Botany, Connecticut Col- 
lege, selected 55 beautiful species from both 
North America and Europe ranging from black-eyed 
Susans andbuttercups to spectacular lilies, orchards, 
and irises. His explanations of habitats, varieties, 
and folkloric uses are on one page opposite a full 
page exquisite watercolor of the wildflower. 

This is a small hand-sized jewel of a book. 

A BOOK OF ROSES by Bryant Logan, 1984. William 
Morrow & Co., Inc., 105 Madison Ave., New York, 
NY 10016, 4iXQi in. hardback, $10.00, 128 pages. 

Another small book with the same format 
as the one above. The 55 roses were selected 
by Peter Nalins, rosarian of the Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden. Logan's descriptions, including the pedigree 
and suggested garden uses, are delightful. An 
example, 'Oregold' — "A bloom will float like 
a rising sun when placed alone in a shallow bowl." 

Drew McGhie's full page paintings, in natural 
color, of these 55 perfect blossoms are lovely. 



A WILDFLOWER ALPHABET by Elizabeth Cameron, 
1983. Webb & Bower, Ltd., 9 Colletion Crescent, 
Exeter Dover, EX2 4BY. Published 1984 in US 
by William Morrow & Co., Inc., 105 Madison Ave., 
New York, NY 10016, 8X11 in. hardback, $9.95, 
64 pages. 

A perfectly charming book originally written 
to acquaint her grandchildren with wildflowers. 
Each wildflower from A to Z has delightful water- 
color illustrations with the hand-lettered passages 
giving derivation of the name and how to pronounce 
it. A description of its habitat, practical uses, 
and legends, along with a few lines of what Mrs. 
Cameron calls her doggerel verse, is on one or 
more pages opposite a lovely full page watercolor 
drawing of the flower described. 

A perfect gift for any child or grandmother. 



The Complete Handbook of GARDEN PLANTS 
by Michael Wright, 1984. Published in US by 
Facts on File, Inc., 460 Park Ave. South, New 
York, NY 10016, designed and produced by the 
Rainbird Publishing Co., 40 Park St., London, 
W 1.5* X 8 in. hardback, $18.95, 544 pages. 

This is a handy guidebook to over 9000 
species and varieties of decorative outdoor garden 
plants grown in temperate climates of the world. 
The format is organized according to basic plant 
types, such as trees, shrubs, climbers, perennials, 
bulbs, rock plants, etc. A color plate of botanical 
drawings is opposite each page of plant descriptions 
of the size, habits, flowering season, form and 
color, as well as sun and soil needs, and hardiness. 

A book that gardeners and garden enthusiasts 
would be delighted to have in their library. 



BOTANY IN THE FIELD by Jane Scott. An In- 
troduction to Plant Communities for the Amateur 
Naturalist by Jane Scott, 1984. Prentice-Hall, 
Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632, 7X9 s in. paper- 
back $8.95, 165 pages. 

The author's excellent black and white 
line drawings enhance her text which is written 
in a style that makes this book as interesting 
for armchair reading as for the naturalist student 
studying plant communities. On page 69, "The 
first yarrows, Achillea millefolium , bloom in June. 
The flowers of some are not the usual creamy 
white but a subtle dusky pink. By late June the 
common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca , unfolds 
heavy pink blossoms that hang like fragrant popcorn 
balls in the leaf axils. The five petals are attached 
to a clublike column and hang down rather like 
a tiny hula skirt, hiding the sepals." 



DICTIONARY ON BOTANY, Elizabeth Tootill, 
General Editor: Stephen Blackmore, Consultant 
Editor, 1984. Facts in File, Inc., 460 Park Ave. 
South, New York NY 10016, 6X8 3/4 in. hardback, 
$21.95, 390 pages. Pub. simultaneously in United 
Kingdom by Penguin Books Ltd. 

Prepared by Market House Books Ltd., 
Aylesbury, England, this dictionary encompasses 
both the pure and applied aspects of plant science 
including: taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, bi- 
ochemistry, cell biology, plant pathology, genetics, 
and ecology. Also covered are selected terms 
from the fields of agricultural botany, horticulture, 
and microbiology. 

This is a technical reference source for 
high school students, undergraduates studying 
botany as well as anyone interested in horticulture, 
agriculture, or physical geography. 



THE VICTORIANS AND THEIR FLOWERS by 

Nicolette Scourse, 1983. Croom Helm Ltd., Provi- 
dent House, Burrell Row, Beckenham, Kent BR3 
1AT. Published in US by Timber Press, P.O. Box 
1632, Beaverton, OR 97075, 7^X10 in. hardback, 
$22.95, 215 pages. 

An extraordinary book— a combination 
of authoritative botanical information and fascinat- 
ing social history richly illustrated by photographs, 
in color and black and white, of Victorian floral 
extravaganzas and reproductions from botanical 
plates of the era. Dr. Scourse gives a fresh new 
perspective on this remarkable period and the 
enormous impact this era had on the gardens of 
today. No aspect of the Victorian efflorescence 
in gardening and the nineteenth century explosion 
of knowledge is left untouched. Much of the variety 
and glory of our gardens today is a legacy from 
the Victorian's world-wide preoccupation with 
plants. 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



57 



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58 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




NOW 

IS THE 

TIME 



compiled by PENNY BUNKER 



A CULTURAL CALENDAR O.F CARE FROM OUR AFFILIATES 

BEGONIAS Margaret Lee 
Now is the time 

to cleanup. Clear out all dried leaves, 

spent blooms, and dead wood, 
to trim back stragglers and restake where 

needed, 
to prune for shape, and to encourage more 

side-growth. It is advisable to prune 

gradually, not more than 1/3 of the 

plant at a time to avoid too great a 

shock, 
to water plants when there are no rains; 

keep plants moist, not wet. 
to mulch with a top dressing to protect 

roots, 
to repot those that need it. 
to start a spray program to control pests 

and disease, 
to start sprouting the beautiful tuberous 

begonias, 
to start new plants from leaves or cuttings. 

BONSAI Dr. Herbert Markowitz 
Now is the time 

to watch watering program if no rains. 

to graft deciduous trees. 

to protect from extreme cold; place in 
garage or under cover. 

to move trees gradually into more sunlight 
to encourage healthy growth; take care 
of deciduous trees to avoid scorching 
their new leaves. 

to watch for aphids and other pests. 

to add small amounts of chelated iron or 
acidifying preparations to correct 
alkaline salts buildup. 

to start trimming shoots which have changed 
the shape of the trees. 

to wait until April to fertilize. It is 

better to use 2 strength spaced several 
weeks apart than to use full strength 
only once. Be careful not to use too 
much fertilizer as it can burn roots 
and cause leaf-tip damage. 

BROMELIADS Linda Prell 
Now is the time 

to begin repotting plants that have outgrown 

their containers, 
to check plants for snails and slugs; distribute 



bait around the plants, not in the cups, 
to begin removal of pups that are at least 

1/3 the size of the mother plant, 
to keep cups free of rotting debris, 
to trim off damaged leaves caused by cold 

weather. Clean up plants, 
to begin a regular fertilization schedule 

using I strength balanced fertilizer, 
to remember insufficient light will keep 

the gorgeous colors from appearing 

in the leaves. If you have pale plants, 

increase the light. 

CACTI & SUCCULENTS Rick Latimer 
Now is the time 

to let winter-active succulents become 
dormant; for example, some cacti, 
the winter growing mesembs, cotyledons, 
dudleyas, and pelargoniums. 

to continue to water some genera, such 
as most of the aeoniums, but some 
should receive no water, such as the 
conophytums. 

to check succulents between the above 
extremes for their need of water. De- 
pending upon the needs of the particular 
plant, spray only enough to keep roots 
alive to prevent extreme shriveling. 

to begin watering the summer active suc- 
culents such as most cacti, stapelias, 
senecios, and anacampseros. Lithrope 
may be watered after they have used 
up last years leaves. 

to take immediate action if pests are dis- 
covered. Check in plant crevices, under 
leaves, along the stems, roots, and 
buds. 

to propagate plants from divisions and 
cuttings. 

CAMELLIAS Les Baskerville 
Now is the time 

to maintain a regular watering program 

if no rains, 
to feed plants with fish or acid fertilizer, 
to keep blooms picked up to prevent petal 

blight, 
to prune plants as they finish blooming 

to open up plants to air. 
to feed iron to promote healthy green 

growth. 
to watch for loopers and spray with mala- 

thion if present, 
to plant new bushes while still in bloom. 

DAHLIAS Abe Janzen 
Now is the time 

to remove tubers from storage and place 
in sprouting medium — vermiculite, 
sand, or other starting material, 
to check moisture of medium. Tubers 

will rot if it is too wet. 
to prepare planting area, fork in humus 
and fertilizers, especially super 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



59 



phosphate and potash (use 2i lbs. for 
each 100 square feet of ground. 

to drive stakes into ground before plant- 
ing tubers. 

to plant tubers two or three weeks after 
sprouting. Dig a hole 6 inches deep, 
mix in bone meal, then place tuber 
on its side, with sprout up, 2 inches 
from stake. Cover with 3 inches of 
soil, moisten, but do not keep wet. 

to protect from snails. 

EPIPHYLLUMS (Orchid Cacti) Frank Granatowski 
Now is the time 

to maintain good grooming by removal 
of dead, spindly and unsightly 
branches. 

to remove dead leaves and debris from 
containers, eliminating a haven for 
harmful pests and allowing free flow 
of oxygen to the soil and root system. 

to remove scale residue clinging to the 

sides of containers, 
to give mature plants a final feeding 

of nitrogen-free fertilizer, such as 

Bloom-Builder or Hi-Bloom, to promote 

healthy buds and blooms. 

to watch new buds and blooms for aphids 
and ants attracted by the nectar; if 
necessary, use insecticides such as 
Orthene and malathion. Carefully read 
and follow directions on the label. 

to refrain from relocating plants once 
buds have begun to form. 

to bait for snails, a few granules of 

Sluggeta have proved effective when 
placed at the base of plants, leaving 
little or no residue. 

FERNS Ray Sodomka 
Now is the time 

to remove dead fronds. 

to divide, repot, or add leaf mold to those 

plants needing it. 
to fertilize with high nitrogen liquid or 

pellets, 
to spray for aphids and scale, 
to plant spore, 
to catch rain water to use on plants in 

covered areas, 
to maintain humidity by keeping surrounding 

areas damp. 

FUCHSIAS William Selby 
Now is the time 

to pinch new growth on plants that were 
pruned earlier. As the third set of 
leaves form on the new growth, pinch 
out the terminal set to give a bushier 
plant. 

to fertilize with any good balanced fertil- 
izer. 

to prune plants that were not done earlier. 

to watch for rust, aphids, or inch worms 



60 



and treat accordingly, 
to water thoroughly the day before spraying, 
to cleanup fallen leaves, blossoms, and 

trash, 
to continue to take cuttings from prunings. 
to watch any frostbitten plants. They 

may recover. Do not prune until new 

growth starts, then prune to the new 

growth. 

GERANIUMS Carol Roller 
Now is the time 

to water thoroughly when plants become 
somewhat dry. Allow excess to drain 
away. Keep foliage as dry as possible. 

to continue a balanced fertilizer dissolved 
in water, using about half the recom- 
mended strength as often as needed 
to keep plants growing well. 

to continue a pest control and disease pre- 
vention program using products according 
to the manufacturer's directions. 

to selectively prune and pinch zonals and 
ivies for future bloom. Avoid cutting 
regals because their flowers will be 
lost by pruning at this time. 

to remove faded flowers and old, discolored 
leaves. 

to continue to rotate plants in order to 
produce well-shaped plants. 

GESNERIADS Mike Ludwig 
(African violets, gloxinias, etc.) 
Now is the time 

to clean debris from around plants. Discard 

old leaves and flowers, 
to repot root-bound plants, cut off dead 

roots that look brown and soft, 
to start feeding as new growth starts. 
to rim plants and take cuttings, 
to cleanup growing areas and spray for 

mildew and mold, 
to spray for aphids before new growth 

is out and bait for slugs and snails, 
to fertilize in April with trace elements 

if you did not repot earlier, 
to use a liquid chelated iron, if growing 

tips shows yellow; spray the foliage 

twice, at three days intervals. If 

leaf shows green only in the veins, it 

has been watered too much. 

HEMEROCALLIS Southwest Hemerocallis Society 
(Daylilies) 

Now is the time 

to divide overgrown plants before hot 

weather, 
to replant in well-prepared soil with plenty 

of humus. 
to fertilize established plants with a fertil- 
izer of 1-1-1 ratio (such as 6-6-6) or 
a 1-2-1 ratio (such as 5-10-5). Do not 
feed new plantings until they have be- 
come established, 
to control aphids if necessary. 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



IRISES San Diego-Imperial Counties Iris Society 
Now is the time 

to clean beds and keep weeds under control. 

to water regularly if no rains. 

to start feeding with low-nitrogen, all 

purpose or liquid fish fertilizer, 
to watch for pests. Systemic sprays applied 

as a drench will usually free irises of 

aphids and thrips. 
to give Japanese and Louisianas acid food; 

camellia-type fertilizer may be used, 
to feed spurias. 

OKCHIDS Charlie Fouquette 
Now is the time 

to check spiking plants and stake them 
if necessary. Be careful about turning 
pots as the spikes can be distorted reach- 
ing for the sun. 

to fertilize cymbidiums with a 30-10-10 
fertilizer and give them as much 
light as possible without burning 
the foliage for better flowering 
next season. 

to check cymbidiums for their need to 
be repotted and/or divided. Repot 
or divide as soon as possible to give 
new growth time to mature before 
the next blooming season. 

to be cautious when watering, your potting 
medium will be slow in drying out during 
cloudy spring days. 

to be extra careful when watering 
phalaenopsis so that water does 
not remain in the crown overnight. 

to continue to be alert for cold drafts or 
sudden temperature drop that causes 
bud blasting. 

to check for slugs and snails, their reproduction 
cycle is accelerated during damp spring 
days. 

to do spring house cleaning; cleanup benches 
and space around plants. Slugs, snails, 
and sow bugs hide in debris between 
their nightly foray on cherished 
flower spikes. Do not leave a 
place for them to hide in or under. 

to check sunlight intensity as summer ap- 
proaches. You may need to start applying 
shade for the outdoor plants. 

ROSES Brian Donn 
Now is the time 

to supply plenty of water for growing plants 

if rainfall is light, 
to feed established plants with a balanced 

rose food every 3 to 4 weeks, except 

when in full bloom, 
to give liquid rose food to new bushes when 

growth is about 2 inches long, 
to give newly planted bushes that seem 

to be growing slowly, a root-stimulate 

such as Hormex or Super Thrive, 
to keep foliage beautiful, disease, and 



pest free, use (about every 10 days) 
Orthene and Funginex, which can be 
mixed together and applied in one ap- 
plication. This mixture may be used 
to eliminate thrips which cause brown 
'freckles' and streaks on petals. 

to check foliage for signs of worms or 
rose slugs. Spray with malathion or 
Sevin — only use the powder form on 
new growth to prevent buring new foliage. 

to keep check on hybrid tea roses, disbud 
while sidebuds are immature. 

VEGETABLES 

Now is the time 

to start seeds of beans, corn, cucumber, 
eggplants, peppers, summer squash, 
and tomatoes in pots to protect 
seedlings — transplant to garden 
in April and May. 

to set plants of broccoli, cauliflower, celery, 
chard, kale, lettuce, onions, and collards 
which are available at nurseries. 

to set plants previously started or obtained 
from nurseries — cucumber, eggplant, 
pepper, tomato, and summer squash. 

to protect plants from frost and rain with 
a translucent cover. 

to set bulbs of onions and cloves of garlic. 

GREEN THUMB ITEMS 

Now is the time 

to finish planting bareroot trees and shrubs 

in March, 
to prune spring flowering shrubs and trees 

using sprigs for arrangements to enjoy 

their beauty. After blooming is finished, 

mulch with leaf mold and manure and 

water well, 
to cut back poinsettias, removing all last 

year's growth to within two joints of 

the old wood, 
to divide chrysanthemums. Make divisions 

and take cuttings from old plants, 
to set out annuals such as zinnias, pansies, 

marigolds, and petunias for spring and 

early summer color, 
to tie up foliage of daffodils and narcissus 

to be neat, but do not cut off until 

it has naturally withered and dried — 

the leaves feed bulbs for next season's 

flowers, 
to plant perennials such as carnations, 

gerberas, marguerites, Shasta daisies, 
to plant cannas, gladiolus, and tuberous 

begonias, 
to feed nearly everything in April that 

was not fed in March, 
to mulch and reseed lawns in April where 

necessary; to feed the well established 

lawn, 
to water bedding plants, small trees, and 

shrubs if rains have ended. 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



61 



[Continued from Page 36) 

SAN DIEGO CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 
Pres: Dr. Leroy Phelps 280-9690 
409M - 36th St. San Diego 92104 
2nd Sat. Casa del Prado. 1 :30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. John Nichols 435-4971 
1026 Flora Ave. Coronado 9211B 
3rd Wed. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY BRANCH. 

NATIONAL FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Mike Reilly 434-1B3B 
4024 Crescent Pt. Rd. Carlsbad 92008 
2nd Thurs. Heritage Hall.McGee Park 
258 Beech. Carlsbad. 7:00 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Martin Walsh 277-5165 
4077 Mt. Everest Bl vd. SanDiego 92111 
4th Tue. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERB SOCIETY 

Pres: Mrs. Barbara Baker 755-9226 
P.O. Box 13B7. Rancho Santa Fe 92067 
2nd Sat. Homes of Members. 11:00 am 
[No meetings in July or August.] 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Jesse Canale 274-1144 
3436 Brandywine St. San Diego 92117 
1st Tues. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO DAYTIME AFRICAN VIOLET SOC. 
Pres: Mrs. Toni Baker 5B2-7516 
6475 - 50th St. San Diego 92120 
2nd Mon.Fel lowship Hal 1 . Chris tUni ted 
Methodist Church. 3295 Meade. 12 Noon 

SAN DIEGO EPIPHYLLUM SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Eugene Lund 469-1677 

5666 Aztec Dr. La Mesa 92041 

2nd Wed. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO FERN SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Marvin Haworth 465-2727 
10453 Fairhill Dr . SpringVal ley 92077 
3rd Thurs. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA & SHADE PLANT SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Ron Berkel 465-7649 
1142 Osage Dr. Spring Valley 92077 
2nd Mon. Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO GERANIUM SOCIETY 

Pres: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 
4444 Arista Dr. San Diego 92103 
2nd Tues. Casa del Prado. 7:30 pm 

SAN DIEGO GESNERIAD SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Mike Ludwig 574-1138 
642 Torrance St. San Diego 92103 
1st Thurs, Casa del Prado, 7:30pm 

SAN DIEGO-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOC. 
Pres: Mrs. Archie Owen 753-7648 
227 Peckham Place. Encinitas 92024 
3rd Sun. Glendale Federal S&L 
740 Lomas SantaFe. SolanaBeach. 1 : pm 

SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Henry McCarty 749-B560 
28034 Glenmeade Way .Escondido 92026 
3rd Mon, Casa del Prado. 7:30 p.m. 



SOGETSU SCHOOL OF IKEBANA 

Pres: Mrs. Leroy Lahey 423-1571 
2829 Flax Dr. San Diego 92154 

SOUTHWEST GROUP. JUDGES COUNCIL 

Chair:Mrs .Ralph E.Rosenberg 295-1537 
3671 Pringle St. San Diego 92110 
1st Wed. Casa del Prado, 10:00 a.m. 

SOUTHWEST HEMEROCALLIS SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. C. R. Bowman 273-7937 
3927 Sequoia St. San Diego 92109 
1st Sat. Feb-Apr- Jun-Sep-Nov. 1 : a .m. 
Quail Gardens Meeting Room 
Quail Gardens Rd, Encinitas 

VILLAGE GARDEN CLUB OF LA JOLLA 

Pres: Mrs. Edward Sheldon 456-0506 
656 Granville Place. La Jolla 92037 
4th Thurs. La Jolla United Methodist 
6063 La Jolla Blvd. La Jolla. 1:00pm 

PROFESSIONAL DIVISION 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. 

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER 

Pres: Mr. Hank Coide 297-4216 

5115 Linda Vista Rd. San Diego 92110 




HELPFUL HINTS 

FOR 
GARDEN TOOLS 

Always losing tools in the 

garden? Buy them with 
unpainted handles, then paint 
in brightest colors, or dayglow, 
to make them stand out from 
ground, lawn, or flower beds. 

To prevent rust, take off 
loose dirt from tools. Clean 
them in a bucket of sand 
moistened with motor oil. 
Store indoors. 

Garden tools can be sharpend 

at a lawn mower shop. 

Leaning brooms upright causes 
uneven wear. Hang brooms 
up, or lay them down 
horizontally. 

Bamboo rakes will not damage 
a lawn. They may be wired 
with a coat hanger to 
strengthen. 




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62 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



(Continued from Page 
APR 13, 14 



APR 13, 14 



34) 



APR 13, 14 



APR 16 

San Diego Floral 

Event 



APR 16, 17 



APR 20, 21 



APR 27 



APR 27 



APR 27, 28 



APR 27, 28 



MAY 4, 5 



MAY 4, 5 



MAY 5 



SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 58TH ANNUAL SHOW "ROSE REFLECTIONS" 

Balboa Park Club, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sat: 2:00 to 7:00 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Donation: $1 
SOUTH BAY BROMELIAD ASSOCIATE 18TH ANNUAL SHOW 

South Coast Botanic Gardens, 26300 South Crenshaw Blvd., 

Palos Verdes Peninsula, Calif. 

Sat: 12:00 to 4:30 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Admission to Garden: $1.50; Students, Youths 5-7, 62 or over: 75$ 
FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 54TH ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW "COUNTRY 
CHARM" 

Potter Jr. High School, Bower's Auditorium, 1743 Reche Rd., Fallbrook, 

Calif. - Sat: 2:00 to 8:00 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 
SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION MEETING 
SPECIAL DINNER & PROGRAM 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Tues: 6:00 p.m. Program: 7:30 p.m. 

Reservations: (No Later Than April 12th) 488-0082 
POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 15TH STANDARD FLOWER SHOW 
"LET'S HAVE A PARTY" 

St. Peter's-by-the-Sea Lutheran Church, 1371 Sunset Cliffs Blvd., 

San Diego— Tues: 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Wed:10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 
SAN DIEGO BONSAI CLUB 20TH ANNUAL SPRING SHOW 

Special demonstration by John Y. Naka, world renouned Bonsai Master 

and author. 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego Free 

Sat. & Sun:10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Demo/Lectures: 1:00 & 3:00 p.m. 
RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN FIRST SPRING OPEN HOUSE 

Displays, Demonstrations, Guided Tours 

1500 N. College Ave., Claremont, CA Sat: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
VILLAGE GARDEN CLUB OF LA JOLLA ANNUAL PLANT SALE 

Central Federal Savings 6c Loan, 7777 Girard (at Silverado), La Jolla 

Calif. - Sat: 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
FRIENDS OF FULLERTON ARBORETUM 12TH ANNUAL 
"GREEN SCENE" 

Fullerton Arboretum Grounds, California State University, 

Fullerton Campus, off Freeway 57, west on Yorba Linda to Associated 

Road, Fullerton, Calif.- Sat. 6c Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 
SAN DIEGO-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 20TH SPRING SHOW 
"SPRING IRIS FIESTA" 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sat: 12:30 to 5:00 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Free 
DOS VALLES GARDEN CLUB STANDARD FLOWER SHOW 
"RURAL LIFE HAS CHARM" 

Valley Center Community Church, 29105 Valley Center Road, Valley 

Center, CA - Sat: 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Sun: 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. Free 
EXOTIC PLANT SOCIETY ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Sat. 6c Sun: 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Free 
QUAIL BOTANICAL GARDENS FOUNDATION "FUN <3c FUNDS FESTIVAL" 

Quail Gardens, Ecke Family Bldg., 230 Quail Gardens Dr., 

Encinitas, Calif. - Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 



ers 



TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

2545 Capitola Road 
Santa Cruz, California 95062 

36-page Color Catalog 25 cents 




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Garden Designer 

& Consultant 

artist 
(619) 566-3851 



MARCH-APRIL 1985 



63 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN (USPS 084-020 
San Diego Floral Association, Inc. 
Casa del Prado, Balboa Park 
San Diego, CA 92101, USA 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



Mrs. John H. FOX #9 
3300 Kellogg Road 
San Diego CA 92106 




SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 

PRESENTS 

39th ANNUAL 
ORCHID SHOW 

Rainbow of Orchids 

MARCH 22, 23 & 24, 1985 

PLANT SALES 



AL BAHR TEMPLE 

HIGHWAY 163 & CLAIREMONT MESA BLVD 

(Next to the Sands Hotel) 

MARCH 21 SHOW SETUP 

MARCH 22 JUDGING AND PREVIEW NIGHT 

MARCH 23 & 24 OPEN TO PUBLIC 

REMEMBER THIS IS A WEEK AFTER THE SANTA BARBARA SHOW 



FOR QUESTIONS CALL OR WRITE: 

SHOW DIRECTOR 
BERNARD ROTH, M.D. 
4477 AMPUDIA ST. 
SAN DIEGO, CA 92103 
(619) 296-6437